5 Tools to Build Following and Increase Interactions on Google Plus

November 24, 2014 · Filed Under Social Media · 3 Comments 

Even though we’ve been all skeptic (quite rightfully so judging from a few of Google’s miserable attempts to enter the social media business), Google Plus is still alive and even thriving. In many industries (Travel, technology, business), it’s even rocking!

In my experience (and I am in one of the most popular Google Plus niches: Search and social media), Google Plus has a huge potential of connecting you to influencers and sending traffic to your site.

Here are a few things I’ve found:

  • Google Plus posts have a much longer life span than Twitter updates (especially for visual content)
  • Google Plus lets you better target your updates than any other social network (Thanks to circles which are surprisingly working)
  • Google Plus posts may give your Google search visibility (in personalized results: Your friends will often see you photo and your update when searching Google). This results in even longer life span: Sometimes I see my one-year-old update suddenly get new likes!
  • Google Plus can send a good traffic to your site (Not as good as Google, in some industries not as good as Facebook and Pinterest, but definitely better than Twitter)
  • Google Plus updates can rank in general Google search results that make their lifespa enormous. Sometimes I get plusses for Google Plys updates that date back to two years ago!

All in all, Google Plus is definitely worth investing your time into. And here are a few tools to help:

 

1. Google Plus /Explore: G+ Content Marketing

The first tool is Google’s own /Explore section that lets you explore Google Plus trending updates outside of your circles.

Most importantly, the section lets you monitor trending Google #hashtags: If you want a wider a reach for your G+ content, try using those hashtags from time to time to see much better interactions with your updates.

Monitor trending Google hashtags

You can also use the section to explore “Related hashtags” to embrace a more targeted approach to Google Plus update tagging.

Google Plus Related Hashtags

 

2. Circloscope: Manage Your Google Plus Circles Easier

(Freemium)

This tool has really no alternatives. We talked to its co-founder at our Twitter chat and I started actively using the tool after that (Disclaimer: They gave me a free PRO account to play before the chat).

Some users have reported 1000% growth in followers & engagement after just a few weeks of using Circloscope. I personally got over 2k +1s on a blog post due in large part to using Circloscope smartly

Circloscope has a ton of features and I have yet to discover all of them but here are those I am currently using:

  • Discover and circle active users of any community (you can filter results to set the minimum number of followers)
  • Discover and circle users who have interacted (liked, re-shared, commented) with the particular Google Plus post
  • Discover and circle users who are following you (Who you are not following back)
  • Discover people who are not circling you back or who are not active on Google Plus for a long time
  • Discover and circle people who are going to the same event you do!

Circloscope Google Plus Circle Manager

Circloscope is quite powerful for free (the paid version also supports Google Plus business pages and some bulk actions). The only limitation is that you need to be using Google Plus to run it.

 

3. Cyfe: Monitor Google Plus Hashtags Easier

(Freemium)

Cyfe is the only tool I know that allows to effectively monitor Google Plus hashtags. It allows to set up a separate dashboard that would be built of as many widgets you need. I have a separate dashboard for Google Plus searches:

Manage Google Plus hashtags

  • Monitor search for any or many Google Plus hashtags (Surprisingly, Google hashtags do actually work for visibility!)
  • Monitor search for any terms you care about (depending on your niche)
  • Whenever you see anything of interest: (1) Go to the update to like and better comment and (2) Add the author to circles. That’s a great way to discover new contacts and generate meaningful interactions!

4. Google Plus Ripples Bookmarklet: Participate in G+ Discussions around Any URL

(Free)

This tool is browser-based bookmarklet that gives you an easy access to “ripples” (i.e. public shares of any URLs). While you can use Circloscope to add interacts to circles, this one lets you see and participate in various discussions around any URL:

Monitor Google+ Plus Ripples

You can use it to discover ripples for your own articles or for any other article where you think you can contribute to a discussion.

And yes, make sure to circle Google Plus users you discuss articles with!

 

5. CircleCount: Discover Trending Google Plus Communities

(Free)

Participating in active Google Plus communities is one of the best ways to discover new connections, build traffic and build your Google Plus following. Google Plus does allow you to search for related communities but the search is very limited.

CircleCount ranks Google Plus communities by “fastest growing” which makes it a great discovery tool for active communities. I also like it because I can find some amazing groups there I wouldn’t have thought to look for, such as “Inspirational Quotes” and “Google Plus PRO” tips.

Manage Google Plus Communities

When you are establishing yourself within a community, don’t forget to comment on others’ posts as well. It’s a great way to build following!

Do you have any tools you are using to grow your Google Plus presence? Please share them in the comments!

 

About the Author: Ann Smarty is the Founder of MyBlogU, the free community allowing bloggers to brainstorm and participate in group interviews. Feel free to catch up with us on Facebook!

KnowEm.com Welcomes Sarah Evans to our Advisory Board

May 5, 2011 · Filed Under Announcements, KnowEm News · 2 Comments 

KnowEm is happy to announce communications consultant and owner of Sevans Strategy Sarah Evans addition to our advisory board, lending her expertise on public relations, journalism and social media and sharing five tips on how to keep your identity safe on social media.

Sarah (@PRSarahEvans), a longtime friend and supporter of KnowEm, is everything from a PR entrepreneur to one of America’s “Tweethearts,” but it’s her personal mission to engage and employ the use of emerging technologies in all communication that connects her with a rapidly growing base of more than 60,000 people.

Sarah created and moderates #Journchat, the first-ever weekly live tweetchat for public relations professionals, journalists and bloggers. She runs her own blog at PRsarahevans.com and shares a daily resource for public relations professionals called Commentz.

In recognition of Evans’ role on the advisory board, here are five tips from Evans and KnowEm to keep your identity safe on social media:

1. Avoid malicious links – Be careful when clicking on links, particularly if receiving a direct message (DM) with a link – even if it’s from a trusted source.

“Of the shortened URLs leading to malicious websites that Symantec observed on social networking sites over the three-month period in 2010, 73 percent were clicked 11 times or more, with 33 percent receiving between 11 and 50 clicks. Only 12 percent of the links were never clicked,” according to the Symantec study.

2. Monitor third-party app access – Check in Facebook, Twitter and other social media accounts for third-party apps that you may or may not have granted access to your accounts. If you don’t trust or recognize the connection, revoke the apps access.

3. Strengthen your passwords – To help prevent cyber attacks and phishing scams, make sure your password is at least six characters long and contains a series of numbers, letters and punctuation marks if possible. Facebook advises not to use words found in the dictionary and select a password that’s different from any other password you select on the Internet.

4. If your Twitter account is hacked – If you notice unexpected tweets or DMs sent from your account or receive an email that you recently changed your email address associated with the account without taking any action, most likely, you have been hacked. If this happens, log out of the account, clear your browser cache and your browsing history. Once done, open a new browser window, log in and change your password and revoke access to any unrecognized third-party apps.

5. If your Facebook account is hacked – If status updates or comments appear on your account that you didn’t write, you might have been hacked. Reset your password (if able to access your Facebook login, hit “forgot your password” link to switch). After, clear your browser cache, delete your Internet history and monitor your access to third-party apps on Facebook.

Please help us in welcoming Sarah to the KnowEm family!